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Full text of "Amboy Centennial: August 6-8 1954 official souvenir program"

AM BOY CENTENNIAL 



AUGUST 6-8, 1 954 




'l.C.R.R.BUTLDO OS 
eTnl)raciii^ Round House, Machine &iBiacksiniths Shops & Water House 



AMBOY, LEE CO. ILL ? 

1656 



F 

547 
.L5 
A17 



OFFICIAL 

SOUVENIR PROGRAM 



PRICE — S(^ CENTS 



AMBOY SINCE 1854 



BRADY BEFORE THAT 



BRADY'S QUALITY MARKEI 



The "Old Reliable" served 
Amboy all his life." 



PHONE 13 



WM. J. BRADY 



The "Young Reliable", new In 

dad'i old stand, is here to 

serve you. 



AMBOY 



From Amboy's newest business, eongrafulations on your 100th birthday. . . . 

LA WTON'S 

DAIRY ISLAND 

On U.S. 52 — Comer of Mason and Hawley 
SAVE on The Finest Grade A Dairy Products 
Mn.K COTTAGE CHEESE ICE CREAM 



Congrafulafions 

LEO J. DEMPSEY 



Insurance Agency 



PHONE 60 



AMBOY 



HOBBY AND HANDICRAFT 



SPORT iN;G good; 



PHONE 3-8681 



DKON 



^ /; 



SAUK VALLEY CC LIBBARY 



3 1516 00016 2774 

For 100 Years Amboys Leading Barbers 

THE FLACHS 



PHILLIP I 



1855-1896 



FRANK ("Dad") - 1873-1943 



PHILLIP II - 1901 



SPITZ SHEET METAL SHOP 

AMBOY, ILL. 

Sheet Metal Work, Furnace and Boiler Repairs 
of All Kinds 

T/MKEN OIL AND GAS FURNACES 

It Your Burner's on the Friiz . . . Call SPITZ 



OSCAR BERGA 

GRAIN. FEEDS. SEED 
MIXED FERTILIZER & SUPERPHOSPHATE 

Bulk Delivery & Spreading 

Distributor of 

ARCADY FEEDS 

For All Live Stock & Poultry 
CUSTOM GRINDING 



Telephone 26 



Amboy, Illinois 



First Class Hardware from the 
Same Stand Since 7877 

NOWE'S HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

AMBOY, ILL. 
PHONE 28 

MAYTAG HOT POINT 

SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE 
'"^042409 



To our many Amboy friends we extend 
good wishes on your 100th Birthday 

THE 

DEAD END INN 

SOUTH OF GRAND DETOUR BRIDGE ROUTE 2 
PHONE GRAND DETOUR 2481 

SPECl AIMING 

SEA FOODS — STEAKS — CHICKEN 
OPEN 5-12 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAYS 

A\R CONDITIONED COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



FREDERICK J. GLESSNER L. HAROLD GLESSNER 

GLESSNK HARDWARE & LUMBER CO. 



PHONE DIAL DIXON 43741 ELDENA, ILLINOIS 



We extend a heartfelt welcome to our 
Amboy Friends on your citys Centennial 

SAM'S STEAK HOUSE 

MENDOTA 



We'll progress together during the next 100 years 

LEE COUNIY FARM BUREAU 



1916—1954 



Welcome to Amhoy 

Don't forget fo visit us and see our centennial display . . . 

JOHN T. BURNS & SON 

Men's, Young Men's and Boys' Clothing 



Serving this community for the past 100 years 
Tomlinson Funeral Home 

ESTABLISHED 1854 
See Our Window Display during the Centennial 



Bill Welcomes Amboy's Centennial 

Fish on Friday Chicken on Saturday 

BILL'S TAVERN 

SUBLETTE 

The place to come fo have some fun. 

THE AMBOY NEWS 

"Lee County's Lorgesf and Liveliest Weekly" 

100 YEARS OLD IN 1954 

Watch for our Centennial Edition 
in October 



Compliments Of 



Wm, A. Keho 



Congratulations Amhoy 



BOB'S 
SUPER SERVICE 



PHONE 144 



AMBOY 



MARCHESI BROS. 

AMBOY THEATRE 

We/come You To T/ie 
Cenfennial 7854-7954 



It too has made progress from the nickelodeon days 
of the silent screen ... to the talkies and sound . . . 
with modern air-conditioning. 

And now to presentation of life-size movies ... on 
the big Panoramic Screen. 

After a hard Centennial Day attend a movie . . . 
for rest and relaxation. 



Welcome O/d Timers and Visitors 
To Amboy's Centennial 

For your Favorite mixed drink 
stop in at 

O'BRIEN'S TAP 



For fine foods come in and try Hazel Kuhn's cuisine, 
including Chicken, Fish, Turtle, French Fried Shrimp, 
Steak, Sandwiches and Ravioli. 



Air Conditioned 
For Your Comfort 

Budweiser on Tap 



Your genial grocer extends congratulations on your Centennial 



REYNOLDS' ROYAL BLUE STORE 



Aufhorhed News Agency 



Amboy's Complete Grocery 



Phone 50 



AMBOY 



Congrafulafions To Amboy On Ifs Centennial From 
Lee County's Only Oliver Farm Equipment Dealer 




V. 0. BONNELL FARM EQUIPMENT 



New Idea Farm Equipment 



PHONE 32 



SUBLETTE, ILL. Distributor, McKee Vacuum Blowers 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK in AMBOY 

AMBOY, ILLINOIS 
successor to Jos/a Little's Bank established in 1868. 



We invite j'ou to call and start Amboy's 

new century by allowing us to serve you. 

We will appreciate it. 



Members of Federal Reserve System and 

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



Salutations to Amboy-may the next century he still hetter 



Livestock Hauling -- Home Insurance 



YERN WASSON 



PHONE 16 LEE CENTER ILL 



Congratulations on your 100th Birthday 



DEMPSEY'S TAP 

Sc/i/ffz & Old Sfyle Beer Wine Liquor 



FRANK & VI DEMPSEY AMBOY 



Welcome to Amhoy^s 100th Anniversary Celebration 

YOUR 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER 

DEALERS 

W. G. LEFFELMAN and SONS 

PHONE 54 AMBOY, ELL. 



Congratulations 



TO 

Amboy Community and Citizens on your 

100th - BIRTHDAY - 100th 

We have enjoyed doing business in this Community for the past twenty six years. 

7928 — Handling the below lines — 7954 

HARDWARE ■ FRIGIDAIRE APPLIANCES ■ SPEED QUEEN WASHERS ■ PHILGAS AND 
PHILGAS APPLIANCES ECLIPSE LAWN MOWERS ZENITH RADIOS AND TV 



1928 MARTIN A. SCHUETTE 1954 

HARDWARE 

PHONE 18 AMBOY, ILLINOIS 



With the Memorable 100 Years of the Past Come Our 
Wishes for Great Things for the Future of Amboy 



Harold W. Carroll 



I CHEVROLET ^PSMOBILE v • SALES wttlCE i 



Carl S. Knudten 



Compliments Of 
Forman Nursing Home 

3Iorris and Marian Forman AMBOY 


• 

CHARLES E. DUKES 

General Hauling — Custom Shelling 
AMBOY PHONE 391R22 


Do you have a drainage problent? 

RAY ROCHO 

Drainage 

AMBOY PHONE Y 62 


R. L. Evans 
Hardware & App iance Store 

SUBLETTE, ILL. 

Dr'i Gas - Roper Ranges & Wafer Heaters 


The Original Site of Carsorr Pirie's 

DICK'S TAP 

Richard P. ("Dick") Lenihan, Proprietor 


Greetings From 
Shearer's Gamb e Store 

AMBOY 


Compliments Of 
Rosemary Shop 

Mrs. Leon Fischer, R.N., Proprietor 


AMBOY 100 YEARS DUCKY'S 23 YEARS 

Neis Rexall Drug Store 

Everything a drug store should be 
ORSINGER'S ICE CREAM 



Compliments Of 

THE MENDOTA REPORTER 

One of the Nation's Largest Weeklies 



ELLIOTT'S CAFE 

AMBOY 

Headquarters For 

Fishermen, Hunters 

and 

All other Liars 



Bertha 



Doris 



Rita 



Betty 



McGRATH'S 
PACKAGE STORE 



35 JONES ST. 
AMBOY 



BEER ' WINE - LIQUOR 

"A Thrifty Place to Buy" 



WHITE ELECTRIC 

Contracting — Repairing — Fixtures 

DEEP-FREEZE APPLIANCES 

Refrigerators — Ranges — Deep Freezers 

MOTOR REPAIRING 

Amboy, El. Phone 34R3 

"FOR WIRING RIGHT— CALL WHITE" 



Congratulations Amhoy 
On Your 100th Birthday 

Gish Jewelry & Gift Shop 



AMBOY 



MENDOTA 



Our Sincere Congratulations 

to Amboy on your 100th 

Anniversary 

We Telegraph Flowers 

PHONE 30 

AMBOY 
FLOWER & GIFT SHOP 



Happy 100th Anniversary 

Bruce Wilson's Billiards 

and 

Sporting Goods 

AMBOY 



Compliments Of 
Amboy Master Barbers 

Lee Co. Unit — No. 14. U.M.B. 



McNINCH GROCERY 

Genera/ Merchandise 

LEE CENTER, ILL. 



CENTENNIAL GREETINGS FROM 

STERLING SALE BARN 

SALE EVERY THURSDAY - ■ WE APPRECIATE YOUR CONSIGNMENTS 
SPENCER & SHOFNER, Auctioneers 



WHERE GOOD FRIENDS MEET 

SIL'S TAVERN 

WEST BROOKLYN, ILL. 



CONGRATU LATIONS 



SAM'S FURNITURE 

S. W. SAM, Proprietor AMBOY, ILL. 



HILL MOTORS 

HUDSON SERVICE AND REPAIRS 

A. G. HILL, Proprietor LEE CENTER, ILL. 



ELDENA GROCERY 
Groceries, Meafs and Ice Cream » Conoco Gasoline 

ARCfflE SEVERSON Phone 4-3761, Eldena, Illinois 



COMPLIMENTS 

DR. W. J. McNEE 

Chiropractor 
AMBOY, ILLINOIS 



We'll see you during your Centennial — 
WHEN IN DIXON, DROP IN 

JOE'S PLACE 

JOE, ETHEL, ANN and JANET DEMPSEY 117 S. GALENA, DIXON 



AUTOGRAPHS & MEMOS 

Names not listed on pictures are available upon request. 



7854 AMBOY, ILLINOIS 1954 

TIME GOES YOU SAY -AH NO . . . 
TIME STAYS -- WE GO. 



It is not proposed to make this booklet a history of Amboy — such hos been adequately 
done in previous historical texts and in Father Anthony Becker's centennial book entitled "THE 
BIOGRAPHY OF A COUNTRY TOWN, U.S.A." Suffice it to say that the parent areas of what 
is now Amboy were Shelburn on the west and Binghompton on the east, and, when the Illinois 
Central was laid out roughly midway between the two, the further development of Amboy was 
assured. 

The first white men settled in the area of Amboy in about 1834 and within two decades 
the population had grown to approximately 2000, only slightly less than it is today. The peak 
of population, 3200, was reached just before the turn of the century when the I.C. Shops were 
flourishing. 

With the closing of the I.C. Shops, and later the discontinuance of passenger train serv- 
ice, many railroad men and their families made their exodus and the population steadily de- 
clined for several years but is again on the upswing — may it continue ever upward. 

This booklet is designed primarily to revive memories of persons, places, and events 
in Amboy's past, upon the occasion of the celebration of her centennial on Aug. 6-8, 1954. 
The authors hope it will give our readers great pleasure and take you back in memory to those 
good old days when life did not roll at such a rapid pace. 

The Souvenir Booklet Committee composed of John P. Walsh, M.D., chairman, John 
McGowan, William McMahon, Richard P. Lenihan, William Clark, Joseph Mead, Ralph Fanelli, 
G. Berne Winans, David McGraw, Ray Hillison and Byron Treadwell have spent many hours 
in gathering and organizing this material for your entertainment and wish to collectively thank 
all who helped us in compiling the voluminous data obtained. As you see, these are mere "broths 
of lads" whose memories do not go back more than a few years because of their comparative 
youth, but the "old-heads" helped us out in getting names and dates straightened out. 

Our thanks go to John P. Walsh, Jr., for his aid in typing material and to Mrs. James 
Jones for her invaluable aid in typing and proofreading this booklet. 



The Amateur Dramatic Association, with many of Amboy's leading citizens in the cast, as indi- 
cated from the handbills below, furnished entertainment at intervals throughout each year. One can al- 
most hear the soft weeping as the villain perpetrated his dastardly deeds and the cheers as righteouness 
prevailed at last. 




VfoFmiD 




^ Charlotte's Maid! 




lie|;)iiat5ur jjjji jyfiijj* .issociation 




Friday Evg Mar 30 



OAEMJALL 

THE TEST OF GRATITUDE 

TtatJrfufVpf^'/S^V i |(il.N,pb«.) w''L'il'i'»li3i 

nmnr MlaraoHt, i.n Ol't Print ■<! Il.i1rnri>i Pblllp 41arli 

Mr. f-Hptaa Hlmrtirf <aik»7«I'*> r. R. DM) 



Diiij^G^ iJLDslSOiWS 



Admission 25c. - - - - ChUdren 15o. 




The races, Derby Day and later on the annual Lee County Fair in Green River Park were not to be 
missed. Do you remember the races through the trees before the race track back by the present ball diamond 
was built? Maybe the pictures on the next page will refresh your memory. 




Some say the track 
ran the other way. This 
could be the result of an 
error in original photo- 
graphic printing of the 
negative, but it is left 
this way to provoke dis- 
cussion. 



Do you recognize 
anybody? We know 
Molly Mead is in the 
first row in the lower 
picture and wonder 
what horse she picked 
that day. 




Celebrities were also 
a part of the picture 
when Derby Day rolled 
around. 




They say his system 
was based upon shout- 
ing to get his own steed 
in high gear and then 
keeping up the chatter 
to the dismay of the 
other horses in the 



■■?!Jl^i^V^ 



m : V. ' 










In the third row we 
recognize Carl Flessner, 
Fred W. Leake, Sr., and 
his mother. Can you 
spot others? 



Baseball m Amboy has always been actively supported. What has happened to the teams of yester- 
year? In the past decade, interest has flagged to where you almost have to scout the county to scrape 
up a full team. We need and must reawaken the competitive spirit which always kept Amboy represented 
by two or more teams. Remember those we picture here? 




AMBOY 
ST. PATRICK'S — 1909 

Front row 1. to r. : 
Joe K e 1 1 e h e r , John 
Boyce, Leroy Bates, 

Back row 1. to r. : 
Harry Poths, Henry 
McCoy, John Strass- 
burger, Tom Rooney, 
Leo Lynch, Jim Lester. 

Dr. Henry McCoy has 
changed a bit over the 
years but still retains 
the gleam in his eye 
shown here. 



Amboy Shamrocks - 1909 

Front row: Dave 
McGraw, John ' Buckley, 
R. P. (Dick) Lenihan, 
Frank McGowan. 

Back row: Wm. 
Remsburg (Mgr.) John 
(Mull) Lenihan, Billy 
Kline, Geo. Kiefer, Bob 
McCarthy (Mgr.), Lov- 
ell Porter (bat boy), 
Tom Hehir, Ed Kelleher 



Baptist Maroons - 1910 

Front row 1. to r. : 
Seated : Batboys : Wal- 
ter Scott, Robert John- 
son, Harry Doty, Bob 
Scott. 

Middle row: 1. to r.: 
Broderick, Lloyd Plume, 
Rex Flach, "Speck" 
Aue. 

Back row 1. to r.: 
Ralph Heath , Byron 
Tread well, Ray Fortney, 
Charles Scott, Leroy 
Bates, Chas. Koesler, 
Harry Poths, Edward 
James. 




They even gave the 
ball teams a parade in 
the old days — wouldn't 
those cars look swell in 
our centennial parade 
down Jefferson St. in 
54. 



Frank McGowan in 
the left foreground is 
nonchalant but "Pug" 
Ullrich and "Dad" Flach 
seem perturbed. Can 
you recognize anyone in 
the stands? 



GEORGE GIPSON'S 
TEAM — 1923 

Front row — 1. to r., 
Joe McGrath, Harry 
Buckley, Geo. Gipson 
(Mgr.), Frank Cole, 
Carl Sisler, (Bat Boy), 
a relative of Carl Sisler, 
name not known. 

Back row — 1. to r., 
"Brick" Brecunier, Abe 
Gilbert, Ned Buckley, 
"Stump" Shoemaker, 
Nate Loan. 




Not knowing whether 
these kegs were used as 
markers for the race 
course or as bases, we 
place this picture here. 
The boy on the left and 
the man at the reins 
were not known to us, 
but George Mercer, J. 
P. O'Rourke, L. E. 
Bates, L. E. Plume, and 
C. E. Scott were. 



We believe this is Am- 
boy High School's first 
football team. In those 
days there was a short- 
age of players, so the 
principal, Mr. Dunlap, 
and the assistant prin- 
cipal, Mr. Williams play- 
ed on the team. From 1. 
to r. front row — Geo. 
Conley, Douglas Bloch- 
er. Middle row — Earl 
Badger, Warren My- 
nard, Harold Mellon, 
Arthur Badger, Geo. Mc- 
Gee. Back row — Profes- 
sor F. W. Dunlap, Ed- 
ward Hogan, Professor 
Williams, Harry Patter- 
son, Preston Wolcott. 



Do you remember 
when Fred ("Scrap- 
per") Chandler ran a 
cleaning shop where the 
bandstand is today be- 
tween the pool room and 
the I. C. tracks? 



That this area was always musically inclined is evidenced by the brass bands which represented it. 




Amboy YMCA Band 



Binghampton Band 



Walfon Silver 
Coronet Band 




WORLD'S TINIEST BAND 

This little band made appearances in several surrounding towns about 1920 From L to R ■ Harry 
Blum, Arhtur Walker, Junior Nicholson, Helen Blum, Mildred Wiser, Russell Anderson Wayne Hike Lois 
Smith, Naomi North, Greta Meyer, Robert Leake, Kermit Vaupel, Joyce Menzmier, Riith Bachofen ' Leah 
Dyar, Evelyn Russell, Richard Tuttle, Samilee Bethard, Mabel Manning, Helen Garett Dorothy Broglev Jack 
Bates, John Griffith, Jay Smith, Edward Mickey, Director Russell Proctor; Conductress Mary Rooney 




AMBOY FIRE 

DEPARTMENT 

DRUM AND BUGLE 

CORP 



A PROMISE KEPT 

Bob Stallion and Frank Merlo always enjoyed a session with the spotted sugar cubes down at the 
Kelly and Cawley establishment in La Salle. One night enroute home after a not so fortunate evening, 
they stopped on the Henkel Bridge, and Bob made Frank enter into a bilateral pact that if either died the 
other would see to it that a pair of dice was dropped into the grave. At Bob's fimeral, Frank, who was a 
pallbearer, waited until the mourners had begun to leave, and then slowly walked over to the grave to 
pay his last respects and keep his part of the bargain. Reaching into his pocket he palmed a pair of dice, 
dropped them atop the coffin and exclaimed in his own inimitable way: "Gosh darn, did you see that? It 
was Craps — Two Sixes." 



JOHN {"SHACK") MeCOY 

This farmer, grocer, saloon keeper, etc., left 
many tales behind. If one remembers his proclivity 
for profanity one can imagine the unprintable 
nouns and adjectives which would have to be inter- 
spersed in any tales about him. 

One of the stories of saloon days is that of 
the inebriate who became nauseated in the used 
beer department and didn't quite make the bowl, 
badly soiling the floor before making his departure. 
Mac was just about finished cleaning up the mess 
when the drunk came back in for reinforcements 
and Old Shack in his rage "politely" ordered him 
out and to make his point more forceful made a 
wild roundhouse swing with the mop he had been 
using. Unfortunately (for Mac) the drunk ducked 
and Mac wrapped the mop completely around the 
head, neck and shoulders of dapper Ed Antoine, 
his bartender, who had to go home and change 
clothes before resuming his duties — and the drunk 
calmly sauntered out of the place leaving Shack 
fuming. 



TAKE ALL 

During one of the Winter holiday seasons 
"Shack" decided to put out a turkey dinner on 
his free buffet lunch and had put it in the back 
room to cool when one of his patrons went back 
and sat down long enough to just about finish the 
bird. When "Shack" came back to carve the turkey 
and found what had happened he about blew his 
top and amid cursing and shouting picked up 
the bird and with many imprecations deposited the 
turkey over the head of the poor drunk with the 

admonition: "Here you ■ , you 

might as well have the keel too." 



AND HE ONLY PAID $2.00 

Dr. Walsh tells the tale of being called to see 
old Shack and on arrival about 8:00 P.M. was ad- 
vised "I'm in bed, you'll have to come back tomor- 
row." Upon returning the next day and asking 

Shack what was wrong he was greeted with: 

you that's what I'm paying you to find 

out. Further questioning only elicited "I'm just too 

old, I've lived to long." 

After prescribing medication and advising Shack 
that the fee was three dollars, he was told: "I've 
never paid any doctor more than two dollars in my 

life and I'll be if I intend to start with 

you." 



GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN 



SPENCER'S IJVERY STABLE — which was located just north of Jones-Berry's present site. 

PICKLE FACTORY — along the "Q" tracks west of the depot, now used as storage point for state equipment. 

LENIHAN & VELTHUYSEN'S TAVERN — w here Gamble's parking lot is today, which burned down 

about 9 years ago. 

THE KIEFER HOUSE — which was located where Carroll and Knudten now park used cars, which burned 

down several years ago. 

The building which stood where the band stand is today, originally the Hussey Coal and Lumber Office, 

later Chandler's Dry Cleaning Shop and then Chandle r's Restaurant. It was moved to the northwest corner 

of Strobel and Main and was the nucleus of the present Hageman residence. 

THE STOCK YARDS — located where the Lee Co. Service buildings are today. 

THE OLD WATER TOWER along the "Q ". 

THE OLD ELEVATOR along the "Q" which burned down several years ago. 

THE HAWK HOUSE, later the Emery Mansion, whi ch was situated at the north end of town where Hoyle's 
Service Station is now. In its day it was an aristocratic showplace, but was torn down a short time ago. 



CHANGING FACES IN THE BUSINESS DISTRICT 

The general structure of the business district from past pictures, stabihzed about 30 years ago as far as 
construction is concerned. There have been many facial uplifts over the years before and since, with new 
fronts, repaintings, etc., but we wonder how far back you can go in remembering the change in type of 
business conducted on the various premises. We have tried as far as possible to be accurate but may have 
made a few errors due to our relative youth — if we have, no harm is meant but you can send any corrections 
to the Centennial Booklet Committee in 2054. 



MAIN STREET— north side and going west: 

PAGAN'S CLOTHING— Boynton Richards Cloth- 
ing — L. B. Searles Clothing. 

ROSEMARY- STORE (now managed by Mrs. Leon 
Fisher with "Big Butch" as a model) — formerly 
managed by Mr. and Mrs. Jack Elliott. — Matie 
Hammond Ladies Wear — Farm Bureau — Jenkins 
Jewelry — J. F. Long Grocery. 

BELLOWS STORE — Roy F. Doty Grocery— Leakes 
Dry Goods Store. 

AMBOY THEATRE— Eichler Bros.— Leakes Dry 
Goods — Gunning's Variety Store. 

W. E. POWERS GROCERY— Post Office. 

HALLS SUGAR BOWL— Bill Hull's Confectionery 
and News Stand — A. D. Neis Drug Store — Ourandts 
Drug Store — Kaufmann's Drug Store — Whonke's 
Drug Store — Dr. Wilcox Drug Store. 

A. & P. — Epperson's Furniture — Frank Vaughan 
Furniture and Undertaking Parlor. 

JOHN T. BURNS AND SON— Colson Clothing Store 
— Spangler's Variety Store — Spaf ford's Harness 
Shop. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK— (There were formerly 
two buildings where the present bank now stands.) 
East side housed the Josiah Little Bank, the pre- 
decessor of the present bank. West side was J. P. 
Canavan Dry Goods Store — Jane McGraws Store. 

FANELLI'S CONFECTIONERY STORE— T o n y 

Gallo's Fruit Store — Brady's Market. 

KROGER STORE — Andersons Hardware Store— 
Husseys Hardware — (There were several short 
term occupants — Gridley's Grocery — Brady's Mkt. 



GAMBLE STORE (now managed by Carl Shearer 
and formerly managed by Bert Howe) — Bellows 
Variety — Anderson's Variety S t o r e — Gridley's 
Clothiers. 

NEIS REXALL DRUG STORE— Aschenbrenner 
Drug Store — W. F. Green Druggist. 

NUGENT'S RESTAURANT— Harts— Hikes— Wag- 
ners — Robert Stallion's Restaurant — Tim Curtin's 
Confectionery — Hayes Ice Cream — Leo Lynch's Ice 
Cream Parlor — Joe Spangler Ice Cream Parlor- 
Oscar Spangler's Ice Cream Parlor. 

MAIN STREET— south side and going west: 

ROBERT G. NOWE — Bill Graves Hardware Store. 

SAM'S FURNITURE STORE— Carr's Bowling Alley 
— Lee County Farm Bureau — National Tea Com- 
pany — White Implement Co. 

SCHUETTE HARDWARE— Anderson's Hardware 
Epperson's Furniture Store— White Implement Co. 
Originally The White Implement Company occupied 
the entire area now housing Sam's and Schuette's 
and the basement at one time and the loft at another 
housed a roller skating rink. 

HAYES VARIETY STORE— John Roat's Harness 
Shop. 

RALPH RUCKMAN'S BUILDING— Jewetts Barb- 
ber Shop — Billy Robertson's Shoe Shop. 

CITY HALL— Housing the volunteer fire depart- 
ment and city jail. 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY— Daniels Grocery— 
Jewett's Barber Shop— Entorf. U 4^4 99 

SAUK VALLEY COLLEGE 



EICHLER BROS.— Amboy Theatre— The Shadows 
Theatre (with Helen Hegert at the piano furnishing 
sound effects). 

THE AAffiOY NEWS. 

GISH'S JEWELRY— Hull's Confectionery— F r e d 
Bybee Confectionery — Store and Restaurant with a 
news stand — John Haas Bakery and News Stand — 
Klein Bakery. 

BELL FENTEN'S MARKET— Leffelman—Fenten 
— Brady's Market. 

AMBOY FLOWER AND GIFT SHOP— John Miller 
Florists, Lyman Rambo — Gertrude Tait — P earl 
Dishong — Dishong and Vaupel — Clara Emery — Ben 
Lewis Tire and Battery — Post Office. 

MICHEL'S BARBER SHOP— Hegert's Tailor Shop 
— Sam Goode and Ray Leake Plumbing and Elec- 
trical Shop. 

BRADY'S MARKET— Murphy's Market— Frank 
Brady's Market — a hat shop owned by Louise 
Whonke (there was a short term ownership of 
various businesses) — Kiefer and McCoy Saloon. 

TOMLEVSON STOREROOM— Brady's former es- 
tablishment as a meat market. 

TOMLEVSON'S FUNERAL HOME— Vaughn Fun- 
eral Home — Brigg's Grocery — (one of our original 
bankers). 

BRUCE WILSON'S BILLIARDS HALI^-Ole Dick- 
inson Pool Room — Hinkle Pool Room — A m b o y 
Youth Center — Sam's Furniture Store — Mershon 
Pool Room — Bill Power's Pool Room — Cotter's the 
barber — Dale's Cigar Factory and Pool Room — 
(downstairs) Elsesser Hatchery — Bill Lyon's Laun- 
dry— (upstairs) V.F.W. Hall. 

EAST AVENUE— going north: 

REYNOLDS ROYAL BLUE STORE— Nattress and 
Murray Royal Blue — Turnquist and Mattivi Royal 
Blue — Plowman's Grocery — Ed. Blum's Grocery — 
Daehler Bros. Grocery — Arnold's Grocery — Rein- 
bolt's Grocery — Badger's Grocery. 

GRIFFITH & ORTGIESEN— Amboy State Bank. 



O'BRIEN'S— Sam's Furniture Store— Hayes and 
Loan Saloon — Lynch and Lenihan's Saloon — George 
Kiefer Hardware and Farm Implement. 

LYNCH POOL ROOM— O'Brien's Pool Room and 
Lunch — Ole Dickinson Pool Room — Dale's Cigar 
Shop and Pool Room — Billy Remsburg's Pool Room 
— George Keeling Buggy Shop. 

HALSEY'S TAVERN— Jim Kelly's Tavern— Lyon's 
and Kelly's Tavern — Lyon's Grocery. 

RUSSELL'S AMBOY CAFE— Arend's Cafe— EUiott 
Cafe — Hempel Restaurant — Loan and Hayes Tavern 
— Armstrong and Krehl's Grocers — Taylor Confec- 
tionery — Norgates Ice Cream Parlor. 

DICK'S TAP— Clark's Grocery— L. Bourne Grocery 
— Carson Pirie's Store — (We know the vigilantes 
ran a saloon keeper out of town to let Carson's in — 
back in 1854.) 

POST OFFICE— Turnquist and Mattivi— Ray Leake 
and Sam Goode Plumbing and Electric — Sh^ baloon 
— Power's Restaurant — John's Hotel. 

CONIBEAR ELECTRIC — Lepperd's Restaurant- 
Berry's Restaurant — Pohl's Restaurant. 

TONY'S ARLINGTON TAP— Melvin Damm's Tav- 
ern — Smith's Tavern — Arlington Hotel (the hotel 
occupied the upper two floors, Bushman's Saloon 
was at street level and Rice's Saloon was down- 
stairs) . 

LEFFELMAN'S INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER 
COMPANY (operated as an International Harvester 
business by a party named Cleveland) — Loan's 
Tavern. 

DEMPSEY'S TAP— Halsey's Tap— Kermit Reinboth 
Tap — Stevenson's Oil Company, well drillers — Bruno 
Reinboth's Saloon — Lee County Farm Bureau. 

FARM BUREAU — ^Branigan's Ford Sales — Spang- 
ler's Garage- 

ANTOINE'S GARAGE— Nicholson's Taxi Service 
— Nicholson's Livery Stable. 

AMBOY COLD STORAGE. 

FRIENDLY MOTORS— Longman's Garage — Reinie 
Hillison's Garage — Glassburn Ford Sales and Serv- 
ice — Mack's Ford Sales and Service. 



JONES AVENUE, East Side Going North: 

McFADDEN'S BARBER SHOP— Blum's Barber 
Shop. 

ELLIOTT'S CAFE— Myrt Bates Cafe— Sam Rose 
Shoe Shop. 

McGRATH'S PACKAGE STORE— Cox Shoe Store 
— O. N. Eckburg Cleaners. 

TURNQUIST APPAREL— Barnhart's Radio Repair 
— Power's Grocery — Powers and Loan. 

CARR'S RECREATION— Lally's Alleys— Anthony 
Berry General Store — McCoy's Garage — General 
Store — ^Bakery. 

JONES AVENUE, West Side Going North: 

MURPHY'S MARKET— O'Brien's Tavern— Barn- 
hart's Electric Shop — Chandler's Tobacco and Shoe 
Shine— T. B. Feillis. 

AMBOY CREAMERY & POULTRY— Boken's Res- 
taurant — Clark's Flour House. 

LIGGETTS BUICK SALES & SERVICE— Edwards 
Buick Sales & Service — Edwards Dodge Sales & 
Service — Fenstermaker's Blacksmith Shop. 

DIVISION STREET, South Side Going West: 

EARTH HATCHERY. 

EDWARD'S ICE HOUSE. 

DIVISION STREET, North Side Going West: 

EDWARD'S GARAGE ON NORTH SIDE OF 
STREET WAS EDWARD'S LIVERY STABLE. 

FRIENDLY MOTORS PARKING LOT— K i e f e r 
House. 

JONES-BERRY LUMBER— Shaw and Bates Lum- 
ber — Vinnings Lumber — Butler Lumber — Fogarty 
Lumber. 

BERT HINRICH'S IMPLEMENT (comer of East 
Avenue and Division Street) — Ed Branigan Coal 
and Implements. 

MASON AVENUE, West Side from North Limits 
and Going South: 

HOYLE'S SERVICE STATION— Van Heuss Shell 
Station — George Gilhan's Oil — Gas and Groceries — 
Henry Smith's Oil Station and Drive In. 



DR. OHLENDORFER, Veterinarian— P & W Elec- 
tric Shop. 

DR. PAUL CABLE— Hey Brothers Ice Cream. 

HAYES JEWELRY— Simcox Jewelry. 

HUPACH PLUMBING. 

ROBINSON WELDING SHOP— Tuttles Plumbing 
— Ray Fortney Garage — Antoine Garage and Milk 
Delivery — Amboy Creamery. 

MASON AVENUE, East Side from North Limits 
and Going South: 

BYBEE'S DRIVE-IN. 

CARTER APARTMENTS— Glenn's Grocery and 
Drive-In — Letha Paulos Grocery — Spencer's O i 1 
Station. 

BILL BRANIGAN MOWER AND FURNACE RE- 
PAIRS — Roy Seloover Coal Yard— Myrt Bates Tic 
Toe Restaurant — John Harvey Gas Station. 

SHAFER FORD SALES— Branigan Ford Sales. 

BRUCE'S ONE HOUR LAUNDRY. 

AUNT MARY'S RESTAURANT— Dorothy May's 
— Thomas Arch Cafe — Toppings — Eastman's, Arm- 
strong's, Holly's — Myrt Bates (always a restau- 
rant). 

HOLT'S REPAIR SHOP— Joe Hammond Tire Shop. 

HOLT CONOCO— Holliston's Service Station— Doug 
Worsley Service. 

SCHOFIELD'S STANDARD SERVICE (previously 
owned by Hoyle's, Grennan's, Stouffer's, Joe Mead's, 
"Pick" Treadwell's, and others, but always a 
Standard Station) — Darwin Zeke Residence. 

MIHM FUNERAL HOME— Keefer Residence. 
SMITH'S SUPER SERVICE— BaU lot. 

SHORT STREET— Delmar Cleaner— Entorf Tin 
Shop. 

SPITZ SHEET METAL. 

BOEHLE IMPLEMENT— Bobbins and Boehle Im- 

plement — Schuette Implement. 




Building of the Leak* Building which 
now houses the Amboy Theatre. 



Governor Dunn* address- 
ing group in Main St. in 
front of the Josiah Little 
Bank. 



Mrs. Haas, Reuben Vir- 
gil, and John ("Dad") 
Haas in front of the Ba- 
kery which was located 
on premises now occu- 
pied by Gish Jewelry 
Store. 






CENTENNIAL ENTERTAINMENT 



FRIDAY — AUGUST 6TH 



4:00- 5:00 Wolf's Accordion Band (Park) 

7:00- 8:00 Band Concert - High School Band (Downtown) 

Crowning of King and Queen (Downtown Bandstand) 
8:30 Centurama - (High School Auditorium) 

German Band will be on streets downtown during evening. 



SATURDAY — AUGUST 7th 



2:00- 4:00 Donkey Ball Game - (Park) 

4:00- 6:00 Water Fight-Firemen (Uptown) 

4:30-5:30 Westgor's Accordion Band Concert 

7:00 Centennial Parade (Route marked and closed to traffic during Parade. 

7:00- 9:00 Roving German Band (Uptown) 

9:00-12:00 Street Dance (Uptown) 

Ikens Group — Square Dancing 

Theldon Myers — Ballroom Dancing 

Saxie Dowell (on stage for introduction.) 



SUNDAY - AUGUST 8th 



AM Attend the Church of your choice 

1 2:30 Barbeque - City Park 

1 :00- 1 :30 Beard Judging and Costume Judging 

2:00- 4:00 Band Concert - State School Band - Games for Children 

Introduction of Celebrities - King & Queen - Beard & Costume Winners 
ADDRESS: Hon. William G. Stratton, Governor, State of Illinois 

2:00- 6:00 Horse Show 

3:00- 3:45 Community Sing 

3:45- 4:15 Closing Numbers by Band 

8:30 Centurama - High School Auditorium 



AMBOY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 

The organization now having this name has had a long developmental history. The first department 
was created in Sept. 1857 but apparently was never well organized and equipped. It was only after several 
disastrous fires that the Vigilant Fire Company was organized. Pictured below is the cover page from the 
Constitution and By-laws and a page from within showing the membership of this organization. 



CONSTITUTION 



BY-Li^WS 



Vigilant Fire Co. 



^0. 1, 



AMBOT, ILLINOIS. 



Organized Nov. 1871. 






"^12' '"""""'• Jl 




MEMBEES. 


Benchbaueh, C 


Isaacs. J 


Bound, P 


Ksle>, J B 


Rrewir, M 


Krlehl,.F 


Bunker, H 


Lenehan, J 


Oarr, J 


Lyman, R E 


Coe, W 


Maloney, W 


DoDOel, fl L 


Masterman, H 


Drummond, Jaa 


Ousey, A 


Eastwood, J 


Ready, T 


Edmondj, W 


Rice, L 


Egan, P 


Bhea, T 


Eib, L F 


BliUtir, F 


KllioU, F 


Spa^r, ZO 


Fessler, R 


Bllmson, O 


Fuary, A 


Stolt, J H 


Oale, W T 


Thresher, IH 


Howard, A 


Triteline, J 


Hu9lon, A B 


Welse, C 





This organization lasted until August 1873 when the Amboy Fire Company No. 1 was organized. 
Somewhere along the line, this latter organization apparently broke up to be supplanted by the Amboy 
Volunteer Fire Dept. which was instrumental in mechanizing the department, buying the first truck in 1924. 
A second truck was purchased in 1928 and in 1953 the present high powered truck retired "Old Wheezy" af- 
ter 29 years of service. Since 1945 the organization has been set up as the Amboy Fire Protection District 
and has been tax supported. 




Weren't they pretty in 
their nice uniforms? The 
gentleman to whom the 
arrow points has been 
named as S. L. Purinton. 
Also note the fine paved 
street. From the build- 
ings in the background 
the date is placed at 
about 1900. 



In the early 1870's a fire in the mills in Dixon 
was raging out of control and Amboy was called 
upon for help, with the result that the hose cart 
and firemen were loaded on a flat car and hustled 
north on the I.C. John Crossen immortalized this 
event in a song which some of you oldsters un- 
doubtedly remember. Maybe you can get Bill Clark 
to sing it for you during the centennial celebration. 



When The Vigilants went to Dixon 

When the Vigilants went to Dixon, 
They made a grand display; 
The breweries and liquor shops 
Were plundered all that day; 
The flax mills and cotton factories 
Were burned down also. 
Joe Carr he got drunk upon 
Hard cider you do know. 

Refrain : 

Hard cider you do know. 
Hard cider you do know. 
Joe Carr he got drunk upon 
Hard cider you do know. 




Amboy's first and second 
fir* trucics. 




Amboy's third and new- 
est trucit. 1953. 







It would be amiss not 
to acknowledge the fine 
cooperation and help 
always given by the 
brother firemen to the 
south which has always 
been sincerely appreci- 
ated. Here they are in 
their new outfit in about 
1934. From left to right: 
Lloyd Plume, E r v i n 
Haws, Dick Donaldson, 
Elmo Litts, Burt Hew- 
itt, and George Miss- 
man (at wheel). 



An Amboy Crew 
In The 30's 

L. to R.: K. S. MacKin- 
non, Burt Hewitt, Ervin 
Haws, Arlyn Ullrich, J. 
C. MacKinnon, James 
Kelleher, George Miss- 
man, William Hubbard, 
Fred Merrow, Robert 
Snooks. 



1954 CREW 

AMBOY FIRE 

PROTECTION DIST. 

Ist row: A. D. Seloover, 
John Hinkle, Wayne Hike, 
Gene Koehler, Ray White, 
Chas. Mead,, Dr. John P. 
Walsh, Kirby -MacKinnon. 

2nd row: Mel Koppien, 
John Liggett, Blair Eck- 
burg, Roy Forman, Ray 
Hillison, Les Kellen, Ken 
Spitz, Roy Powers, Clyde 
Veith, James Thompson, 
Bill Xnuth. 

Lyman Liggett astride 
truck. 



In closing this series on 
the fire department we 
wish to extend our hearti- 
est congratulations to all 
nineteen of its members 
and to the board for the 
fine job you're doing. We 
know your job is tough 
and often thankless, and 
that your reimbursement 
doesn't even pay the clean- 
ing bills or repay for 
clothes ruined. Any time a 
department can roll out a 
crew in 45 seconds, as you 
usually do, we know 
you're on the ball and 
we're proud of you. 




Outstanding service 
always merits recogni- 
tion and we wish at this 
time to extend our com- 
mendation for a job 
well done to Josephine 
McGee who spent 47 
years in the teaching 
profession before her re- 
tirement a few years 
back. We show her here 
with one of her classes 
in about 1900. She is 
still with us and we're 
justly proud of her. 



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BRADY'S MARKET 

Shown in picture: Bruno 
Reinboth, Frank Brady, 
Marguerite Finn. About 
1918. Now Tomlinson 
store room. 




FRANK BRADY 
'The Old Reliable" 



From The Amfooy News of June 15, 1944 

Brady, "The Old Reliable", is known far 
and wide for his generosity and fair dealing. He 
was a friend of all the hoboes who ever visited 
Amboy and in all his years he never turned 
down a tramp who visited his shop. In fact 
in the hobo camps throughout the United States 
there was a slogan, "In Amboy it's Brady for 
meat and Clark for coffee." Very few children 
who ever visited Brady's shop ever went away 
without a raw wiener or a piece of cold meat 
to nibble on. 




William Clark, Amboy's 
Genial Postmaster 



We take our hats off to two fellows of whom it can certainly be said: "He loved his fellow man.' 
Frank was called to his reward a little while back and we're sure that the Great Scorer was waitmg to 
shake his hand for the way he played the game. We still have Bill in our midst and can assure you he 
hasn't changed. It has been an honor to have known both of them and Amboy has been fortunate in hav- 
ing been graced by their presence. 




George Hewitt, Burt 
Hewitt, and Tim Smith 
in one of the first busi- 
ness trucks in Amboy in 
1916. 



Taken about 1919 and 
shows the water tower 
in the memorial park 
across from Jones and 
Berry Lumber Yard. 
Note the narrow divid- 
ed pavement. 








An important name 
in the early history of 
our town, this shows a 
Whonke family picnic. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS 
OF YESTERYEAR 




Do you remember 
when the street car 
came down Main St. to 
the present junction 
with U.S. 52? 



We could not spot the 
passengers in the trol- 
ley, but the gentlemen 
standing in front of it 
are, from L. to R. : Abe 
Jeanblanc, Sherman 
Shaw, Wm. J. Edwards, 
Peoples, Barnes, Andrew 
Aschenbrenner, Philip 
Clark, W. E. Jones, 
Harry Badger, Hill. 



THE KIEFER HOUSE FIRE 




This was a bitter cold night as can be seen in the picture. Fire Chief J. C. MacKinnon had a heart 
attack and died while hurrying to connect a hose to a hydrant. 



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The small white building was the original 
Lutheran Church. It was moved and used for 
several years as the Central School Gymnasium, 
and about two years ago was sold and has now 
been rebuilt into the Schuette Apartments on 
North Jefferson Street. 





Harry Blum and John Boyce (father of Mrs. 
Bert Schneder in front of the livery stable where 
Antoine's Garage is now in operation. 



Green River Drainage Project — 1913 

Top: Construction Camp in Tait's pasture; 2nd: 
Drilling rock at Binghampton ; 3rd : Building dredge 
in Amboy Park; 4th: Launching dredge in Amboy 
Park; 5th: Fishing should have been good when 
they had it like this. 




This 'Could, have been a tragedy 
— fortunately it involved only 
property damage. The passenger 
train was about due when these 
cars jumped the track. John Mc- 
Gowan is the lad with the iron hat 
atop the rear gondola. About 1914. 



Choir in Old Catholic Church — 
About 1880 

Top row, L. to R. : Georgia 
Callahan, Mary Morris, Elizabeth 
Lester, Kate Doyle. 2nd row, 
L. to R.: Mary Boland, Pat 
Lyman, Mrs. Franzen (organist), 
Mr. Franzen, Mrs. Bob Carson. 
Bottom, L. to R. : Kate Walters, 
Thomas Dowd. Mary Morris be- 
came Mrs. Mike Egan and was 
the mother-in-law of the late 
famed Damon Runyan. 



Frank Jewett, Harry Poths and 
Harry Blum, with Guy McEl- 
heney in chair, in Jewett's bar- 
ber shop under the bank, now oc- 
cupied by office of Dr. John P. 
Walsh. The old tile floors and 
bath plumbing may still be seen 
there. After a bath, haircut and 
shave those boys must have 
smelled and looked "mighty 
purty" for their dates. 



Song composed by John Crossen 
ADVICE TO THE TEMPERANCE MEN OF AMBOY 

In 1876, be it in the month of June, 

When the cherry trees and blackberries 

Were flourished in their bloom. 

Old John Reed, the blacksmith. 

He always was inclined 

To put Billy Egan drunk upon his blackberry 



Refrain: Upon his blackberry wine 
Upon his blackberry wine 
To put Billy Egan drunk 
Upon his blackberry wine. 

For ye temperence men of Amboy 
Whoever you may be 
I hope you will take warning 
And be advised by me 
O, look into your bylaws 
And there you'll surely find 
That you can't drink hard cider 
Or touch blackberry wine. 

This 'Could have been a tragedy 
— fortunately it involved only 
property damage. The passenger 
train was about due when these 
cars jumped the track. John Mc- 
Gowan is the lad with the iron hat 
atop the rear gondola. About 1914. 



Song composed by John Crossen when it was 
fhoughf that John Bull was "getting religion" with 
the Salvation Army: 

At the cross, at the cross. 

Where John Bull saw the light 

And the burden of his heart rolled away, rolled away 

'Tis by his good faith 

That the chicken is all right 

And the roosters are crowing every day 

He's the lily of the valley 

My bright morning star 

He's the fairest of ten thousand to me soul. 

Hallelujah he's the lily of the valley 

My bright and shiny light 

He's the fairest of ten thousand to me soul. 



UNFORGETTABLE CHARACTERS 

Do you remember when •'Snowball" McNinch did the 
tight rope walking act on a wire stretched across Main 
Street from the Opera House to Vaughan's Funeral Home 
building? 

Levi Searls, the "mayor of Binghampton" came to 
town almost daily until a few months before he passed 
on and asked everyone if they had a cure for The Tizzies 
or for the Tic Douloureux. 

Henry Antoine made his morning cleaning rounds 
in the First .National Bank, constantly singing, but never 
singing more than one line of any song, carrying the 
tune of each perfectly. He was so meticulous in his pat- 
tern that you could almost set your clock daily by his 
location in the bank 

It is said that Harry Batlger used to have an exact 
number of steps for his daily walk from the bank to his 
home which he rarely varied, and carried that same 
l)recision into most of his activities. 

Harry Gridley, Amboy Township High School's 
oldest graduate returned to school to complete courses 
he needed when he was well past 60. 

John Crossen attended every wake in the area, and 
his spooky stories were .so good that he even scared 
himself. The night of John McGraw's wake, he sent Mrs. 
McMahon for Mrs. McGraw and requested that she allow 
"Johnny" (Dave) to take a lantern and accompany him 
to his home in The Patch. Dave tells of the walk with 
Crossen hearing and seeing imaginary things and ask- 
ing him if he heard or saw them so often that Dave was 
beginning to wonder if he did. In any event, when he 
started the return trip, he was so wrought up that when 
he saw the eerie shadows from the lantern he was carry- 
ing, he took off on the double and says that those boys 
who just cracked the 4 minute mile had lead in their feet 
by comparison to his time getting back home. 

Catherine Hammond tells the origin of the Sanitary 
Buggy Whip story. When she was just a little girl, her 
mother told her to go out and get some buttermilk, which 
was being sold door to door by two purveyors named 
Mr. Harrison & Fred Lewis. She passed up the pail, and 
the salesman took the lid off the milk can, reached up 
and took the buggy whip from its mounting, and vigor- 
ously stirred the can of milk which was setting on the 
floor of the wagon with the butt of the whip, restored it 
to its mounting, and proceeded to ladle off the pail of 
milk. When she brought the milk in and stated that 
she did not feel that she wanted any, the Sanitarj' 
Buggy Whip yarn was on its way. 

Dapper Charlie Kelly was always good for a lot of 
laughs when he came to town. His story of Billy Darling 
stubbing his toe on the "Sunny Porch" and dropping 
the "Niggerhead" (log) he was carrying on his foot was 
tops. He was always worried that he had the Polly-0 
(polio) too. 



GO?iE BUT ISOT FORGOTTEN 

THE ORIGINAL AND SECOND CATHOLIC CHURCHES in Amboy which were located on the southwest 
corner of the block south of Bob Smith's Service Station on South Mason Avenue. 

THE ORIGINAL BAPTIST CHURCH on North Mason at its present location which lasted from 1857 until 
1923 when it burned to the ground. 

The building where Frank Blocher had a Poultry and Creamery— Priebe Poultry, operated there later. 

ARMANDO FANELLI and his ice cream cart with the kids helping themselves at the risk of posterior pro- 
pulsion, f f 



OLD TIME CLASSES 



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Binghampton School 
1888 




OLD BRICK PRIMARY 
1890 



WEST SIDE SCHOOL 
Amboy, about 189S 




AMBOY HIGH SCHOOL 
about 1897 



WEST SIDE SCHOOL 
Amboy — 1901 



GRANT SCHOOL 
Amboy, about 1905 




EAST SIDE SCHOOL 

Amboy, about 1905 

Now Leo Dempsey 

residence 



AMBOY HIGH SCHOOL 
t906 



AMBOY HOTEL 
Now St. Anne's Convent 




Predecessors of 
Amboy Milk Products 

Ofd West Side 

Creamery Jusf North 

OfCB&Q Traeki At 

Western City Limits 



SANITARY CREAMERY 

Now Robinson's Welding 

Shop on S. Mason 



SANITARY CREAMERY 
On S. Mason 




RAY LEAKE'S 

PLUMBING SHOP 

In What Is Now 

Miche/s Barber Shop 

about 191 S. 

Dave McGrow and Fern 

Sheffler Employees 



Successors to 
Carson-Pirie 
BOURNE'S STORE 
In Picture: Frank Estey, 
clerk: John Edwards, 
Grocery Salesman; L. 
Bourne, Prop.; Charles 
Rabbitf, Deliveryman; F. 
Bourne. 



PHILIP CLARK' & SON 

Succesor to Bourne 
Wm. Clark greeting de- 
scendants of Carson, Pi- 
rie & Scott during cele- 
bration of their 80th yr. 
in business Aug. 4, 1934. 



AMBOY CEmEf^MAL COMMITTEES 



SOlVKMR.BaOKKKT 

Dr. John P. Walsh. Chr. 

.1. M. McGovvan 

Wm. Clark 

Wm. McMahon 

.Joe Mead 

R. P. Lenihan 

B. A. Treadwell 

G. Berne Winan.s 

Dave McGraw 

Ray Hilli.son 



KACILITIKS 

Dale Dickisnn. Chr. 
C. F. Schuette 
Earl Ga.scoigne 
Stacy Flahert.v 
Ted Beister 
Gene Gascoigne 
.lames Listen 
Albert Gascoigne 
Chas. Mead 

(o.MMrxiTV six; 

Dr. O. C. Jones 
Mrs. C. F. Edwards 
Mrs. Neita \'aughn 
Mrs. E. J. Rosado 
Milbert Larson 



ITBLUITV 

Gene Strouss, Chr. 
Mrs. Wm. Knuth 
Miss Beverly Strouss 

WINDOW DISPLAYS 

Dr. D. C. Shapiro, Chr. 
Mrs. Robt. Shafer 
.Mrs. LeRoy June 

FINANCE 

C. W. Robbins, Chr. 
Mrs. Courtney Schafcr 
Milbert Larson 
Mrs. Roy Long 
Mrs. Carl Knudten 
Art Seeds 

LIONS CLUB TO FURNISH 
CHILDREN'S GAMES 

Stan Gibson 
Bob Koehler 
Jim Harris 

DECORATIONS 

Robt. Smith, Chr. 
Fred Nicholson. Jr, 



PARADE 

Art, Seeds, Chr. 

Earl Gascoigne, Co-Chr, 

D. A. Seloover 

John Burke 

Gene Gascoigne 

Ken Spitz 

Clarence Sulli\an 

Harold Hike 



PAGEANT 

Mrs. Chas. Welty 
Mrs. D. C. Shapiro 
Mrs. B. F. Hinrichs 
Miss Marie Ross 
Miss Rose Murtaugh 

CONCESSIONS 

Dr. J. P. Walsh 

WELCOMING 

Everett F. Barnes, Chr. 
Oscar Berga 
Wayne J, Fagan 
Fred R. Bvbee 
Catherine Ruckman 
Alice Hillison 



POKE BONNET^ 

Mrs. B. A. Treadwell. Chr. 
Mrs. James Jones 
Mrs. Allison Blake 
Mrs. Carl Shearer 
Mrs. Geo. Carr 



BUSH lf:a<;uers 

Cecil Nattre.ss. Chr. 
John Scott 
Doug Smith 
Earl Gascoigne 



PURCHASING 

O. P. Dickinson, Co-Chr. 
Chas. Welty, Co-Chr . 

FO«D-SERVIN(; 

Mrs. Ro.y Long, Chr. 
Miss June Pilgrim 
Mrs. Gene Sullivan 
Miss Irene Branigan 

ENTERTAINMENT 

A. D. Ortgiesen 



HORSE SHOW 

Milo Hibbets 
John Miles 
James Somers 
Robt. Shafer 
Wm. Bridgman 

SOUVENIR DISTRIBUTION 
COM.MITTEE 

Robt. Reynolds, Chr. 
Cecil Nattress 
Dale Dickison 



DISASTROUS FIRES IN AMBOY 



December 1863— loss $35,000 

1864 — 5 business houses destroyed with loss of $45,000 

1865 — 7 business houses destroyed 

1867 — 16 business houses destroyed 

1868 — 4 business houses destroyed 

August 25, 1871, most destructive of all fires, loss $175,000 

There have been several major fires since this date but none as destructive as those prior thereto, mainly in- 
volving one or at the most two buildings with total destruction thereof. The standing joke that "they saved 
the foundation" applies no longer. 



We're All Working Together 

HOLrS ARCH SERVICE STATION 

PHONE 146 AMBOY, ILL. CONOCO QUALITY PRODUCTS 


Conilratulations 

ECCLES 
SERVICE STATION 

Frank Eccles, Prop. Binghampton 


Greetings to Amboy on its 
100th Birthday 

BILL-BOB & ROY 

CARPENTERS 

AMBOY 


Compliments Of 
Conibear Electric Shop 

AMBOY 


Happy 100th Birthday to Amboy 

LYNCH BROS. POOL ROOM 

AMBOY 


LEROY DEARDORFF 

Electrical and Elecfron'ic 
Sales and Service 

AMBOY 


Compliments Of 

CARR'S RECREATION 

George - Isabel - Dennis 
AMBOY 


// you want a cold one, stop at 

BUNK & GEN'S 

WEST BROOKLYN, ILL. 



Amboys Centennial My Semi-Cent ermial 

H. C. BARTH 

yE7ER\HAR\AN 

A Golden Anniversary Serving Amboy 



1854—1954 



1904—1954 



W/iy do it the hard way — ? 
Bring if to 

BRUCE'S 1 Hr. LAUNDRY 



AMBOY 



Congrafufatrons Amboy on your 
100th Birthday 

P. & W. ELECTRIC SERVICE 

Admiral Sales & Service 

'Tour home deserves the best, 
that's always Admiral" 



Maybe the next TOO years will 
be better 

Gord 'n' Bob's Tap 



GORDY DEMPSEY 

And 
BOB GALLAGHER 

Dixon 




Centennial Greetings 
HOYLES' SHELL SERVICE 

SHELL OIL PRODUCTS 

MAIN & WASSON 
AMBOY. ILLINOIS 

LLOYD & WAYNE HOYLE, Props. 



When In Mendota Visit 



SHEET'S TAVERN 



For your Wining and Dining Pleasure 



Congratulations Amboy 

BRADY VILLAGE 

Population 6 

Sandwic/ies — French fries 
Beer Pop 



Groceries 



Phone 2-3381 



DIXON 



Compliments Of 
Keenan Council 740 

Knights of Columbus 

AMBOY 



B. F. Hinrichs Implement Co. 

Dealers in High Grade 

COALS ~- COKE 

FARM IMPLEMENTS 

NEW HOLLAND FARM EQUIPMENT 



PHONE 291 



AMBOY, ILL. 



Amboy Since 1854 



Phone 35 



D. L. BERRY 
President & Manager 




NG MATERIAL AND COAL 



Amboy, Illinois 



Since 7900 



Welcome to Amboy on its Centennial and to our Visitors 



HERB HALSEY'S TAVERN 



AMBOY 



Featuring H anurias Beer 



^ G OOP FOO D ^ 



HOSPITALITY 



MEMBER 



SERVICE 



Illinois 
State 
Restaurant^ 
SAss'N. 

1954 



Compliments 
of 



THE AMBOY 
CAFE 

For Yours and You, 
On the Avenue 

GOOD FOOD AT REASONABLE 
PRICES 

Carleton "RED" Russell 
(your host) 

ACROSS FROM THE /.C. DEPOT 



AMBOY. ILLINOIS-lOOth BIRTHDAY 



FARMERS STATE BANK 



SUBLETTE ILLINOIS 



34TH BIRTHDAY 



A fine progressive city with good schools, repre- 
sentative churches, two good industries, hub of the 
county's farm bureau and farm service, a good 
hospital and library — not bad for a century of work 
and may the next century be much better. 



A neat well kept building, adequately equipped, 
checking and savings departments, bank-by-mail 
for your convenience, safe keeping department, a 
favorable reputation in handling of loans. We offer 
you complete banking facilities as a result of our 
34 consecutive years of banking. 



GRADE "A" DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Have the best delivered to your door 

Johnson Standard Dairy 



1114 S. Galena Ave. 



DIXON, ILL. 



Compliments Of 

AMBOY'S OLDEST INDUSTRY 







AMBOY 
MILK PRODUCTS CO. 



WHIP. 



We ^reet our many Amhoy friends 
on your Centennial 



THE LANDMARK 



Private Dining Rooms 
Finest in Food 



Cocktail Lounge 
Air Conditioned 



Wayne Williams, Owner 



GRAND DETOUR, ILL. 



Your Ford Dealer Wishes 




You a Happy 100th Birthday 

• 


Best Wishes 


SHAFER MOTOR SALES 


DOUG'S 3 DEUCES 


^^^ 


Cocktail Lounge 


^^# 


Package Liquor Store 


SALES SERVICE 


DOUG CURRAN DIXON 


Salutations on Your Centennial 




m 


Compliments Of 


Zimmer^s Service and Cafe 




Junction US 52 and 30 


Delniar Cleaners 




For Pickup and Delivery Call 57 



To our many brothers and friends in Amboy we send greetings on 
the occasion of Amboy' s Centennial 


Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 


Dixon Lodge No. 779 


Amboy s 100th Anniversary Our 25th Anniversary 


LEE COUNTY SERVICE COMPANY 


AMBOY, ILL. 


Welcome to Amboy on its 




Centennial. After a stop out West we're now 




home to our friends .... 






Compliments of 


"Skinny" Rapp's Tavern 


COSS DAIRY 


SUBLETTE, ILL. 






DIXON 



75th Birthday of Electric Light 

1879-LIGHT'S diamond JUBILEE-1954 



^^S^^^^ 




With his invention of the first practical incandescent lamp, 
Thomas A. Edison set off an "electrical chain reaction" that has 
over the past 75 years reached into virtually every home, every in- 
dustry . . . into science and education and the arts . . . into every 
walk of life -to help give this country the greatest productivity 
and highest standard of living the world has ever known. Light's 
Diamond Jubilee celebrates the 75th anniversary of the electric 
light--75 years of electrical progress. Our ability to do things bet- 
ter, faster and more economically by electricity stems from Edi- 
son's work in 1879. 



LIGHT For Freedom — POWER For Progress 



PUBLIC 



SERVICE 



COMPANY 



TONY'S ARL N6T0N TAP 


Congratulations to Amboy on the Occasion 


of Its Centennial 


Chicken on 
Prepared < 


Wednesday and Saturday 
3S if should be by Frances. 


SOFT DRINKS 


' 


PACKAGE GOODS 


BEER 


WINES 


LIQUORS 


ANTON J. BERNOTAS, Proprietor 




PHONE 457